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Andrew Roach @ajroach42

I'm installing emacs.

The payload for emacs and related software is 120mb.

That seems silly.

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@ajroach42 I use only two program: Firefox and Emacs. If you look at this this way, it's not that big.

@GeekDaddy In 2008, I used Damn Small Linux as my primary OS.

50MB.

50MB got me a web browser, a word processor, a text editor, a crazy amount of other software, and drivers.

@ajroach42 still emacs is smaller than Slack and more functional xD

@ajroach42 @GeekDaddy Back when I was interested in Business Card Linux, I managed to get Emacs into the distro by kicking out documentation, source files, fonts, and more. Emacs can be smaller. But nobody wants to spend too much time on it. And when I get Emacs without docs and sources on Debian, I am disappointed, too.

@ajroach42 but it comes with dunnet!
emacs -batch -l dunnet

I don't even use emacs, but I enjoyed that game.

@oct2pus @ajroach42 Nah, the problem with Atom is that you replicate the same code and its bloat across apps. With Emacs, the incremental add-on for another app tends to be quite small.

@ajroach42 That sounds high, though haven't checked mine. However, there is so much potential utility there that there is little I wouldn't give up in space to enable it, which I wouldn't say about say, MS Office. Now, is that *everything*? Emacs has a package manager for many add-ons that are selectable.