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Andrew (R.S Admin) @ajroach42@retro.social

It just gave me an estimate! It popped up and said that it'll take more than 8 hours to finish this encoding.

On my i7.

So... I guess this is what you would call asymmetric compression, in that it takes a ton of time and effort to encode in order to take very little time and effort to decode.

Also, my new projector arrived and is wonderfully sharp and vibrant and I can't wait to try it with full sunshine so I can see if it solves my problem.

I'm encoding a film with Smacker now and the first thing I'm noticing is that it is SLOW. I'm 23 minutes in, and so far it is still analyzing the video, and has not started the conversion yet.

It also appears to be missing some features that I would expect it to have (specifying color depth, for example, or output resolution.)

So AV1 looks like the solution for video on modern machines.

Smacker or cinepack seem the most likely for older machines.

Do any of you have any experience with smacker encoding?

I guess I will also need to look at vorple or whatever the new non-patent encumbered hvec competitor is called, for use on modern PCs.

(Because I'm going to end up self hosting, so you're going to deal with tiny video files.)

Looks like my most likely options for video playback on a 486 or early pentium are smacker, cinepack, and mpeg-1.

There are some other less promising formats, too. Mv-1 and ideo being the only others I can remember.

I'm really curious about smacker and cinepack compression vs fidelity vs playback speed.

I know what mpeg-1/vcds look like (in terms of quality, playback requirements, and file size) but not the others.

Once I have the video finished, I'm going to look in to the video equivalent of a (which, in this case, might be an svcd? Or maybe just an xvid file.)

I wonder if I could get it to do video playback...

Goddamn it. Now I gotta find out what is the highest bitrate video that a pentium will play. (that sentence is wrong, but I'm too far past that thought in my head to figure out how to fix it.)

It has an Ethernet card in it. And I think I can get drivers working for that.

So now the plan is to get networking working, and then get it connected to my raspberry pi comms box.

I'll drop a few dozen game folders on the comms box and ftp or wget them on to the Unisys.

Once I've got all that done, I'll do a breakdown/walk through video. I might add some overlays and effects from my Amiga, I might not.

I guess I have to make some videos now.

And it plays podcasts. Or at least it plays this specific

More pictures to come.

(I may have gotten a new computer. I may be installing PC/GEOS\\Breadbox Ensemble on my little unisys box right now.)

It's still "out for delivery" and has not been delivered. And now I'm sad.

We got a new projector to replace our old projector that broke and it's supposed to be here today, and it's not here yet.

The post office says it's out for delivery.

But the post office has already delivered for the day, so they must be doing a second run.

I am trying to be patient, but I am very excited.

I finally did it, here's King's Quest in its original 16-color glory, on my 1000TX!

I really need to learn morse code.

I crush more than an industrial compactor